The Quotable KineSophy

Albert Camus, part of the quotable KineSophy

Earlier this month, I wrote about the authors who influenced my early thinking about the topics covered in KineSophy. In this post, I present the views of some of those authors in their own words. Here are quotes from six authors on the relationship between physical, mental, spiritual and ethical … Read more

KineSophy: The Back Story

Finishing IRONMAN 70.3 Branson in 2012, part of the back story of KineSophy

It has been almost five years since I started blogging on KineSophy. With the unveiling of the new, expanded version of the site, I think it’s high time I said something about the back story of the KineSophy project. There are a lot of health and fitness blogs out there. … Read more

Is Life a Virtue?

There is a common assumption that life is a virtue, that the mere state of existence is something to be cherished, prolonged and assiduously safeguarded. Facebook and Pinterest posts offer us “5 Tips for Living Longer” and “12 Tricks to Be Healthy.” Gatorade reminds us “Life’s a sport. Drink it … Read more

KineSophy in Practice

KineSophy in Practice

Over the course of several previous articles, I have argued for a comprehensive ethical theory that incorporates virtues of fitness alongside the more commonly recognized moral virtues. I proposed three ethical precepts of human movement, postulated a two-tier hierarchy of virtues based on the principle of scalability, and demonstrated the … Read more

Surviving vs. Thriving

Surviving vs. Thriving

This month, I’m very excited to feature the following guest post by Preston Sprimont on KineSophy. Preston is a former teacher and a book nerd turned fitness nerd (and still book nerd). He is currently pursuing his Master’s in Kinesiology and spends his time coaching, writing, studying, and training to compete … Read more

How to Save Lives

How to Save Lives

I have previously argued that if you are committed to an ethic of altruism, you have reason to care about your physical fitness (see Why Be Fit? – Altruism). Here’s a summary of that argument in its simplest form, with direct links to articles in support the premises: 1. If … Read more

A Brief Argument for Strength

A Brief Argument for Strength

In a previous post (What’s Your Fitness Age?) I highlighted research that demonstrates the correlation between longevity and VO2max, an indicator of the body’s ability to take in and utilize oxygen. Additional research suggests increased lean muscle mass and leg strength are also strongly linked to longevity. Thus: 1. No matter … Read more

Real Life Female Nepalese Sisyphuses

Real Life Female Nepalese Sisyphuses

There was a fascinating article published in the most recent ESPN The Magazine about a group of Nepalese women who climbed the Seven Summits (the highest peak on each of the seven continents): After the Seven Summits. Many of the women had no previous climbing experience, but after completing their … Read more

Incorporating Fitness in a Theory of Ethics: A Summary

Incorporating Fitness in a Theory of Ethics: A Summary

Twenty months ago, and eight months into the KineSophy project, I began my exploration of a general theory of ethics that would encompass both moral (other-directed) virtues and non-moral (self-directed) virtues, such as physical fitness. At one time, ethicists routinely considered these physical qualities to be virtuous. The ancient Greek … Read more

The Final Piece of the KineSophy Puzzle

The Final Piece of the KineSophy Puzzle

In previous KineSophy articles, I have discussed three ethical precepts of human movement, explored the complementary relationship between physical fitness and other scalable, secondary virtues, and derived secondary virtues, including those related to fitness, from the non-scalable, primary ethical virtue of human inviolability. To complete the KineSophy puzzle and the … Read more