On Primary and Secondary Virtues

On Primary and Secondary Virtues

Having previously demonstrated the complementary relationship between both moral and non-moral scalable/secondary virtues, I now want to discuss the connection between the secondary virtues and the non-scalable/primary virtue. In particular: How do secondary virtues, especially physical fitness, work to support the primary virtue? Is it possible to derive secondary virtues, … Read more

One Minute Abs and More

One Minute Abs and More

Over the past two years, I’ve devoted a fair amount of attention to Peter Singer’s claim that “if it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening, without thereby sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance, we ought, morally, to do it.” Building on Singer’s altruistic/consequentialist arguments, I’ve attempted to … Read more

Another Ethical Precept of Human Movement

Another Ethical Precept of Human Movement

Everyone loves sitting in the emergency exit row on airplanes. And why not? A few feet of extra legroom in exchange for the minuscule chance you might actually need to assist in an evacuation seems like a good trade-off. But does everyone sitting in these seats meet the physical requirements … Read more

Why Be Fit? – Altruism

Why Be Fit? - Altruism

Last month, I began the project of demonstrating how moral virtues can help strengthen physical virtues. In particular, I want to show that any agent who acts according to some ethical standard of moral virtue has reason to consider physical virtues. Thinking of the entirety of ethical theories as a … Read more

Responses to Some Very Insightful Questions From JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey

Responses to Some Very Insightful Questions From JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey

In this post, I answer three great questions posed to me via mail from JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey. We discuss the mind-body connection, pleasure and variation in physical activity. Q1. Are you speaking from a perspective of mind/body as one? I have become quite fascinated with the question of mind/body through … Read more

Why Be Fit? – Hedonism

Why Bet Fit? - Hedonism

Exercise can intensify and prolong many physical pleasures. Thus, even people who subscribe to a philosophy of hedonism (the pursuit of pleasure) have reason to value physical fitness. Ethics and Fitness At the end of last year, I explained my plan to 1) demonstrate the interrelationship between physical fitness and … Read more

The Baseball PED Debate in Contemporary Philosophy

The Baseball PED Debate in Contemporary Philosophy

A year ago, I wrote an article about the grounds on which the Baseball Hall of Fame can exclude suspected users of performance-enhancing drugs, and the rights other public and private institutions have in regards to limiting membership. In the May/June 2014 issue of Philosophy Now, Darrin Belousek offers a different … Read more

PTSD, MMA and the Bully Argument

PTSD, MMA and the Bully Argument

I have suggested a similarity between action in physical fitness and virtuous action. Both require a notion of self, a notion of control over the situation and a notion of value. Given these shared criteria, I believe practicing physical fitness can strengthen moral and other non-moral virtues. Conversely, acting virtuously … Read more

Plato: The First Kinesophile

Plato

In his major work, The Republic, the ancient Greek philosopher Plato offered his ideas for reforming government and its leaders. Among other qualities, Plato believed a good leader should be physically fit. “For Plato, as for most Greeks, physical education was as important as cultivating the mind,” writes Mark Tan … Read more

An Action Theory of Moral Virtue and Physical Fitness

An Action Theory of Moral Virtue and Physical Fitness

Let’s begin by looking back at the topics covered in the past few months. In March, I discussed how yoga has been shown to help improve mood, reduce stress and decrease recidivism in prison inmates. In April, I detailed some recent instances where pick-up basketball games have become associated with … Read more